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Put some thought into it: It’s the gift that matters

By Ron Dupuis

A 1930's art deco enamel, diamond,  and 14-karat gold figural piano compact once owned by concert pianist Ellen Ballon.
A 1930’s art deco enamel, diamond, and 14-karat gold figural piano compact once owned by concert pianist Ellen Ballon.

Gift giving used to be a much simpler task, but its myriad complexities are being tackled by respected social psychologists. Motivation, perception, and acceptance have all been subject to intensive scrutiny. Yet, we can’t forget the element of fun and pleasure involved in finding the appropriate piece for that special someone, something that expresses their appreciation of history, novelty, or rarity when reinvented for today. So let’s take a detour out of the usual same old same old and venture into the realm of possibilities.

Some pieces of jewellery are no longer in vogue, and their original purposes now seem arcane and old-fashioned. Depending on taste and budget, these subtle oddities can be celebrated for what they can be, not just for what they were. Keep your eye out for anything relatively unpopular in its current form, though tweakable. You’ve seen shiny CDs hung with clear fishing line decorating trees and blowing in the wind. Jewellery can have transformations, too.

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